315 East & West
Searles-Reeder-Crichton-McCullough Home
 

Searles-Reeder-Crichton-McCullough 315 East & West Street . Windowed gable w/brackets.  Milled siding.  Various hostories list owners as follows: bult 1890’s by Serles family.  Owned by Reeder family; re-built after fire c. 1921 by Kate Crichton Gredley; bought by Thomas Crichton 1922. burned and re-built c. 1925; bought Dr. J. Hudson, 1976; Terry Love, 1980. Remodeled by the McCullough family in 2000’s

The original home was built in 1890’s by Searles family. This home was owned by Mr. W.W. Reeder a bookkeeper for Drake Hardware. He was a very prominent citizen. This home was possibly added to in 1901-02. Mr. Reeder was the proprietor of Rose Lawn Poultry yards. He produced prize winning high class birds and had one of the most thriving businesses in North Louisiana. When he was interviewed by the Minden Democrat the reporter asked him about different breeds, this is what he had to say “there are many excellent ones but: breeds may rise and breeds may fall but the Plymouth Rocks will survive them all!” He would move between 1914-1915 to a home located at 623 Park Hwy. The home was then rebuilt in 1921 by Kate Crichton Gredley; The next owners were the Tom Crichton family in 1922 the home would burn and be rebuilt again in 1925. Tom’s grandfather was Peter Crichton. Peter and wife Marion with their eight children and Mrs. Crichton’s mother would suffer much tragedy when they came to Minden about 10 years before the War Between the States began, from Georgia. Marion Grieve Crichton wasn’t born in Georgia, she came all the way across the Atlantic from Scotland to become an American she just didn’t know it would cost her so much. They had a happy life, at least until that war started. Eventually Peter and four of the boys joined the Confederate Army, only two of the boys – John and Tom -- ever came back home. The two sons, George and William were killed and later brought home for burial in the Minden Cemetery by their brother Tom. It is Tom’s son Tom Jr. that would come to live in this home. Marion – I see you’ve come to visit us today, a day we remember our soldiers. I guess I know more than I ever want to know about soldiers. I’m Marion Grieve Crichton – these are two of my sons, George and William. I came to Minden about 10 years before the War Between the States began, from Georgia. Wasn’t born in Georgia, I came all the way across the Atlantic from Scotland to become an American – just didn’t know it would cost me so much. My husband Peter and I came to Louisiana with our 8 children and my Mother. We had a happy life, at least until that war started. Eventually Peter and four of my boys joined the Confederate Army, only two of the boys – John and Tom -- ever came back home.

The following is a script from Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk

George – Momma, you know how much we wanted to fight with our neighbors and take a part. I was so disappointed that day in April 1861, when brother William marched off with the Minden Blues to fight the Yankees. We’d moved to Homer then but he went back down to Minden to fight with his friends. Me being the older brother, seemed like I should have gone, but in July, I was able to head to Virginia with brother John to join the Blues. I missed the fight at Manassas in July, in August, I settled into camp. Never got a chance to fight those Yankees, though. Started feeling sick and came down with the fever. They took me to Mrs. Johnson’s house near the camp and that’s where I died – on September 10, 1861, never took part in any battle. And you know it took me a long time to figure out how I got back to Minden. William, you want to tell them about that.
William – I’ll get to it, but since I did get to fight, let me tell my story. Like George said, I left with the Blues in April ’61, before we knew it we were at Camp Moore, and then we were in Virginia, fighting in the Army of Northern Virginia under General Beauregard. He was proud of us being from Louisiana fighting under him. It was at Manassas that we found out we didn’t need those pretty blue uniforms the ladies in Minden made for us. They got us shot at by some other boys from our army, thought we were Yankees. We won that battle, whipped them good and then when George got there, it seemed like good times all around. But like George said, he got sick, who ever thought a boy from Louisiana would go to Virginia and get swamp fever. After he died, it just didn’t seem the same. We fought on through some pretty tough battles. In the Spring of ’62, we were sent out to the Shenandoah Valley, to fight under Stonewall Jackson against General Banks, that’s where I met my maker, at Port Republic, in June 1862. I’ve got to tell you George; I’m not sure how either of us got back to Minden, though.

 
Marion – Well, I know that sad story. After those two boys were gone, I’d had enough of this war, but it just kept going and getting worse. In April of 1863, my Peter was killed, down in South Louisiana at Franklin fighting that same Yankee, Banks. Before I even heard about that, I found out John had got himself shot at Chancellorsville, the same place Stonewall Jackson got killed. They sent him back to Louisiana but he got better and went back to Virginia and then young Tom insisted he had to join up and he went to the army, too. At least John and Tom survived. And as for how we brought George and William back. After the war, Tom got a horse and a wagon and he went to Virginia and found those two boys and brought them back home, to Minden. I guess it’s good to celebrate the bravery, but I’ve heard and lived too much war for my liking.3